A Brief Look at Nokia's History

A few of years ago, Microsoft settled to acquire Nokia's fighting devices including services business, and very lately, the Finnish company sold its HERE planning system to a group of German car-makers.

 

It’s true that Nokia mobile had terrible last few years, but this does not take continuously the case that it was this very business that effectively set the mobile industry for over a decade prior, and provided us amazing of the most excellent phones.

 

Humble Beginnings

While Nokia may suggest most of us of just mobile phones, the company, in fact, began out as a paper mill, which was built in 1865 by drilling inventor Fredrik Idestam at Tammerkoski Rapids in south-western Finland.

 

Still, the name Nokia wasn’t yet had. It was the location of his instant mill - along with the lines of the Nokianvirta river - that excited Idestam to name his company Nokia, something which appeared in 1871. After around three decades, the company also felt into electricity production.

 

When, Eduard Polón established Finnish Rubber Works in 1898, and Arvid Wickström organized Finnish Cable Works in 1912. In 1918, Finnish Rubber Works took Nokia to ensure access to the latter’s hydro-power sources, and in 1922, Finnish Cable Works was also bought by the recently founded conglomerate.

 

When the three companies were jointly held, they continued to work alone until 1967, when they were eventually absorbed, and Nokia Corporation was born. The recently formed group mainly concentrated on four businesses: paper, electronics, rubber, including cable. It stated things like toilet paper, bicycle and car tires, rubber footwear, TVs, fax cables, robotics, PCs, and military facilities, among others.

 

The Finnish company’s unwillingness to adopt a drastic difference when it was needed the most was probably the most significant reason that made the mobile giant forward. The company got way too long to embrace the smartphone change, and when it eventually did, it went way too numerous errors in its approach.